Photo Metadata on iOS

With the recent announcement of new 11- and 12.9 inch iPad Pro models, there have been many thoughts flying around online about what does and does not make the iPad a pro machine. There has been a particular focus on elements such as file management and the inability to connect external volumes to the new USB-C port. To me, this will certainly arrive in a future iOS release… Apple would not have replaced Lightning with USB-C on the iPad Pro if it weren’t serious about the iPad as a productivity device. We’re getting there.

For some time, I have been wishing for a particular feature set to be added to iOS, which unfortunately I think is much less likely: the ability to edit image metadata in the Photos app, such as keywords, titles and descriptions. Photos on iOS already has an impressive range of features based on machine learning, such as facial and object recognition, memories and even synchronisation with contact and calendar information to organise photos automatically. With this in mind, I would assume that Apple deems such manual image management as redundant on iOS.

As an example of when this would be useful, this week my wife and I received our wedding photos from our hired professional photographer. She (the photographer) did a fantastic job of culling and editing the selection before giving it to us, however, I wished to add precise locations to our over 800 photos. Also, rather than just dumping them into an album, which I could easily do on iOS, I wanted to include keywords and descriptions, so that they are all easily searchable in the main ‘Years > Collections > Moments’ interface. All of this still has to be done on a Mac, as no native interface exists for this on iOS. Whilst this process certainly isn’t a chore on the Mac and I have no real issue with it, it’s an example of functional inconsistency that could easily be resolved by Apple. Since my images are synchronised across all of my devices with iCloud Photo Library, it’s only logical that I should be able to interact with and adjust these photos in the same way on each device. There are third-party apps that can achieve this but I don’t wish to risk my data privacy.

In its promotional videos, Apple has shown how its new iPad Pro models attach to other devices via USB-C… imagine connecting a DSLR, importing photos and having full, manual control over their metadata. That sounds like a pro activity.

Some people wish that iPads had mouse pointers and trackpads; others wish for laptop-style hinges to prop up the display, such as the Brydge keyboard. These are major design points that can change the entire interaction model of the device (for better or worse). They’re interesting to consider but much of what makes the iPad so enjoyable is that it is a versatile slab of glass. Its minimalism and difference from traditional computers are the things that make it so fun to use.

To me, it comes down to the finer points of software consistency. I don’t want to have to choose which device I pick up based on what it can or can’t do; I want to choose which device I pick up based on how I want to use it: touch or pointer. If Apple can address such niggling points and offer consistent app experiences across its devices, this will see the iPad’s pro status confirmed. With the addition of pro apps such as Adobe’s upcoming Photoshop on iPad, I’m hopeful that we will start to see a new era of feature parity across iOS and macOS.

iPhone Photography Awards 2018

The winners of the 2018 iPhone Photography Awards were announced this week and the included images are nothing short of breathtaking. From the artistic to the tragic, they all leave a very strong impression.

Source: Mateusz Piesiak/IPPA

What is perhaps most impressive as you scroll down the list and tap on each one, however, is the handsets that were used to shoot these images. Not all photos were taken with a recent iPhone X or 8 Plus; many were taken on older SE, 6s and even 5S models.

This made me reflect on just how different the art of photography is today and it’s now easy to pinpoint when this change began. We’ve just passed the tenth anniversary of the release of the iPhone 3G, which was the first truly international iPhone after the US-only first-gen model in 2007. The 3G brought the launch of the now mammoth iOS App Store along with it and at the time, it sported only a two-megapixel camera. It wasn’t even capable of taking video—a typical Apple feature omission, as when certain features aren’t up to scratch, they’re just chopped and included when ready.

The iPhone 3G was the first iPhone that I ever owned and I have bought multiple new models since. Whilst apps, messaging and full Web browsing were amazing, it was the camera that really resonated with me at the time. The idea that you had a decent camera with you everywhere that you went and that the camera came with its own pinch-to-zoom photo studio was flabbergasting.

Seeing what such tiny cameras are capable of today is a sign of just how far we’ve come since 2008. Improved aperture, secondary lenses, native software enhancements and third-party camera apps on iPhone have led many to leave their DSLR cameras at home. This is undoubtedly why Apple has so strongly pushed its yearly Shot on iPhone campaign and new support and tutorial pages. Not everyone needs a DSLR to capture the world with such precision and realistic colour; an iPhone does the job nicely indeed.

Considering all of this, check out the beautiful winning photos and maybe even take the time to look back at your own photo library from the last 10 years. Has your smartphone changed the way that you take photos? Do you take more or fewer? How do you organise them? Do you share them online? Most importantly, do you back them up? I doubt highly that there is a single person on the planet who has been untouched by the influence of the modern smartphone camera.

Never take the empowering technology in your pocket for granted.

The Conversation: ‘Apple acknowledges the iKid generation…’

Writers Michael Cowling and James Birt put together this great article on The Conversation, which is all about how Apple is tackling excessive use of its devices with the upcoming iOS 12 release later this year.

The authors discuss the powerful features that are coming in the form of ‘Do Not Disturb at Bedtime’, Screen Time app usage measurements and customisable notifications.

What stands out particularly to me, however, is this section:

And this week at WWDC, they [Apple] appeared to acknowledge some responsibility for creating balance in their lives… Parental controls can be activated through Family Sharing. They allow parents to put limits on their kids [sic] usage of individual apps, while allowing unlimited use of education apps.

Parental controls have existed in iOS for some time; it is great that Cowling and Birt are explaining the improvements that are being made in this space.

Parental Controls Icon
Parental Controls icon (Apple)

It is the idea of responsibility though that I find most interesting. Responsibility does fall on Apple to ensure healthy use of its devices, however, I believe that some parents just aren’t aware of these functions or even lack the interest in using them. More often than not, I visit restaurants where parents can be seen placating their children at the dinner table with iPads, iPhones and other competing devices.

For many, these devices have become digital babysitters. I applaud the (albeit late) effort to really enhance this functionality for families, but I believe that Apple should put even greater effort into promoting these tools, even if it takes incredibly annoying splash screens post-update or even TV and online advertisements.

Consumers (and particularly parents) are often the first to voice their annoyance with things like in-app purchases, games and children’s data privacy. Not all responsibility falls on tech companies; it is shared. I hope that adults themselves use these tools and make changes to their app usage behaviour, so that they can make better decisions and boundaries when it comes to their kids’ use of devices and apps.

Keynote Diversity

After much anticipation, the opening keynote for WWDC 2018 has been and gone, with numerous announcements surrounding performance, privacy, security and new features across all four of Apple’s software platforms.

Whilst many in the media have covered the numerous features and improvements that Apple announced (and whether it’s an exciting or ‘quiet’ year), there is one particular element of this keynote that I think deserves more attention.

Yesterday’s keynote included more women than just about any Apple keynote that I can remember. These women were not just brought on stage in a tokenistic or symbolic manner; they were brought onto the stage to discuss enhancements that they have worked on or directed themselves. The effort actually to include women began in 2015 (later than it should have been), with Jennifer Bailey (Apple Pay) and Susan Prescott (Apple News). This year, a female presenter named Jules even demonstrated new watchOS features whilst on an exercise bike in front of the crowd, finishing her segment with an ‘I love you’ message to her daughter.

Jules demonstrates watchOS 5 Workout app features. (Apple, 2018)

This is an outstanding display of company diversity and sets a fantastic example for all companies. Beyond the question of gender diversity, it also continues Apple’s trend of introducing developers and users to different people in the organisation. Back when Steve was in charge, he was often responsible for directing the entire show. Since Tim took the helm, he has adopted the role of ‘keynote bookender’, simply beginning and ending the presentation and allowing others to step forwards. This has enabled the company to highlight the hard work of many of its employees and avoid the reliance on one personality for the company’s overall success and image.

Furthermore, the videos prior to and at the end of the keynote showed a diverse range of developer stories, both in terms of gender and ethnic background.

I hope that Apple maintains its efforts in displaying a healthy mix in its public presentations. The ultimate goal is an even more diverse workforce and company leadership, the latter of which is already on the way to significant improvement with the addition of women over time such as Angela Ahrendts, Katherine Adams, Lisa Jackson, Isabel Ge Mahe and Deirdre O’Brien.

Waiting to #deletefacebook

When I first joined Facebook (towards the end of high school), I was very reluctant do so. I had witnessed others around me use various social media and networking sites — think MySpace and MSN Messenger — only for the most banal conversation. Chats that I saw consisted of nothing more than ‘What’s happening?’ and ‘LOL’. It just wasn’t for me.

The thing that finally convinced me to join was an exchange trip to Germany. I saw the value of remaining connected with friends overseas and understood that it would be useful to chat with local friends as well. Facebook was much simpler then, with a cleaner interface that focused more on actually seeing what your friends were doing and saying. As I entered university, undertaking a degree in communication, I joined even more social networks, hungry to understand more of these digital platforms.

Over the past few years, I shed almost all of those networks. Some were fun; some failed. In the end, I saw them for what they were: a waste of my time. Facebook was always the one that I wanted to delete the most, as I saw it transform into a bloated mess of advertisements and algorithmically-suggested posts.

Whenever I came close to deleting my account, I hesitated. I didn’t want to stay but my many of my friends and photo uploads were there. It seemed such a waste to discard a part of my digital history. Perhaps most importantly, I first spoke to my fiancée Natasha through Facebook, using Messenger. I eventually settled for account deactivation, keeping the account in a state of distant hibernation for quite some time.

With the recent news about Facebook’s data privacy issues with Cambridge Analytica, my frustration with the company and its practices had flared up again. Out of the blue last weekend, Natasha notified me of the Twitter conversation below.

20180320_Elon_Musk_and_Brian_Acton_Twitter

This finally pushed me over the edge. If Elon Musk, a man who runs several companies with millions of Facebook followers, could delete such an account without a moment’s hesitation, then why couldn’t I? I went straight to my study, visited Facebook on my Mac, downloaded my personal account archive and requested full account deletion. Not long afterwards, I received an email saying that it would be deleted within 14 days. Now I’m simply waiting for it to be deleted. They must be snapping the hard drives by hand.

This story of mine is in no way extraordinary, however I feel that it’s useful to share, particularly after spending approximately a decade on the network. Regardless of your level of devotion to Facebook, if you have an account, then you are in some way feeding their machine. The company has been either unwilling to change or is in complete denial that it needs to do so.

Other networks have their own issues too. I love to use Twitter and see it as the best example of social media that can democratise global conversation; it can connect you with people whom you’ve never met in person and (hopefully) expose you to new ideas. The company still has a long way to go to deal with issues of online abuse and trolls, however, and I look forward to seeing them actually do something about it.

For the moment, Instagram is safe on my iPhone, as it seems to have some degree of managerial independence from its parent, Facebook. My finger, however, is always hovering over the button.

Companies that hoard people’s data and use it inappropriately should be paying very close attention to what is happening right now.

If you have ever considered deleting your account, then ask yourself: why haven’t you done it yet? Question the value that it brings to your life. Do you just scroll aimlessly? Do you wonder why you connected with people with whom you never actually speak or meet in person? Are you comfortable with the use of your private information to deliver ‘personalised’ ads?

The time has come to delete Facebook.

Apple’s Music Strategy: Return of the ‘Pod’

Apple’s new HomePod has certainly proven to be divisive, with some reviewers lauding its superior sound quality and hardware design and others criticising Siri’s general intelligence.

I’m not going to review every element of the device; that has already been done to death. I also have no home automation accessories, so discussing HomePod’s integration with HomeKit and other smart accessories is also pointless here. I want to discuss HomePod’s audio quality and how it threads into Apple’s broader music strategy.

I am extremely impressed with the audio quality and can attest to the immersive ‘3D’ effect that HomePod projects throughout a room. It even sounds better than two other decent stereo and soundbar systems that I have at home. I have never heard the level of crispness and audio separation from any home/consumer speaker that I have experienced with this device. Bass is powerful but does not distort; vocals and higher tones are crisp and come to the fore (without sounding over-produced). Song with electronic elements really shine and I have found myself playing OK Go’s song Obsession a lot on HomePod. It sounds fantastic.

What I’m really excited about is Apple’s renewed focus on music. In the noughties, Apple transformed itself into an effective music device and service company with its iPod + iTunes strategy. People who had never owned a Mac (or any other Apple device) were exposed to an array of colourful, reliable music players and a new world of digital purchases. More people entered the Apple ecosystem and with Apple’s product ‘halo effect’, more than likely purchased a Mac and other accessories. As time went on, the torch was passed onto devices like the iPhone and iPad, as the iPod slowly faded away.

The iPod + iTunes area has already earned nostalgic status, as nowadays we enjoy the even greater convenience of streaming millions of songs instantly through our smartphones. It now seems archaic to plug a music player or smartphone into a desktop computer. Apple was also famously late to the streaming party, only now catching up to Spotify’s subscription numbers in the United States. No doubt, this delay would have been influenced by Steve Jobs’s personal views on streaming — he believed strongly in the idea of owning your own music. Remember Cover Flow in iTunes? It was all about creating the equivalent digital experience of flicking through a shelf of vinyl records.

We are now seeing Apple assert itself in the music space again, hitting the reset button after a long, gradual period of declining iTunes music sales. With HomePod and its successful AirPods, Apple is building a musical hardware experience equivalent in scope to its Siri strategy. Siri is everywhere, across all of our devices. The iPod once promised to put 1000 songs in your pocket, and now with HomePod and AirPods, Apple is continuing the ‘Pod’ moniker to show users how they get access to their music in high quality everywhere.

Of course, these great hardware experiences feed back into the success of Apple Music and its increasing number of subscribers. Apple has always said that music is ‘in its DNA’. As the iTunes app on the Mac has become more bloated, we couldn’t always be so sure that Apple had the same focus on music. I’m optimistic about where these things are heading. Perhaps the biggest wish that we all have is the final separation of iTunes’s separate components, delivering dedicated music, podcast and video apps to create true consistency with the experience on iOS.

For now, the HomePod isn’t perfect, but I’m pleased to be an early adopter and see the new software features roll in…

Going Cellular: What It’s Like to Live with Apple Watch Series 3

Image 4
The Apple Watch Series 3 (Nike+) with a third-party band and the Explorer watch face

Since the initial release of the Apple Watch in 2015, much has changed. Now with Series 3 running watchOS 4, this great wearable device has become faster, waterproof and more capable, with numerous apps and functions that can operate independently. Most crucially, it now runs on cellular (mobile) networks, meaning that in many cases, you can actually leave your iPhone at home. Of course, you still need an iPhone, but the convenience factor has increased significantly. Since hearing a recent episode of podcast App Stories, which focused on various use cases of the Apple Watch, I was inspired to write my own account of the device. I wore the first generation all day, every day, but now that I have had time to live with the Series 3, I feel that I can give an appropriate account of what it is like to use.

I received my pre-ordered first-generation Apple Watch on launch day over two years ago and instantly fell in love with it, using it predominately for notifications, activity-tracking and messaging. To say that it was transformative would be an understatement; with its haptic feedback, it sent my phone into a permanent state of silence (no more alert and ringtones!). I could effectively and subtly manage the once infuriating number of notifications, which once led me to pull my phone out of my pocket constantly. I could even act on them.

During this year’s launch event for the Series 3 and iPhone X at the Steve Jobs Theatre, I was ecstatic to see that the watch was finally gaining cellular capability. I was determined to get it. While the iPhone X announcement was very impressive, the watch was far more compelling to me. The notion of leaving my phone at home was tantalising. Don’t get me wrong: I love my iPhone, but every single day, especially on my commute and at lunchtime around Sydney, I observe people who are unable to separate themselves from their devices. Their faces are glued to smartphone displays, often scrolling aimlessly through social feeds.

Perhaps the clearest use case of the new cellular model is independent phone calls, messages and notifications. With seamless number-sharing (connecting and sharing data with your existing mobile plan), the Apple Watch attaches automatically to your network when it detects that it is out of iPhone Bluetooth range. This is indicated in Control Centre, as well as on the Explorer watch face with four dots as an indicator (if you use it). I was impressed that (for once) Australia had reasonable plan rates for sharing phone numbers; it only costs me an extra $5 per month to share data with my Apple Watch on Optus.

Most tech journalists and reviewers mainly tout the new Apple Watch’s cellular connection as a great emergency option, enabling you to exercise without having to carry a phone. This is true, but it is often pushed as the only appealing real-world context when you would leave your iPhone behind. My aim with the Series 3 has been to separate myself from the iPhone in a range of situations, in order to remain free from useless distraction. When I go for my lunch break at work, I always leave my phone in the office and go for a walk. Do I need to check emails? Do I need to look at another screen for an hour? When I go out for dinner with friends and family, I now often leave my iPhone at home. When I go for a coffee on my home-office day, I walk through my suburb to a local café without my iPhone. Not to mention, having Apple Pay on my wrist means that I can go to the coffee shop without even needing to take my wallet. The Series 3 enables me to travel lighter and even distance myself from superfluous technology.

Prior to the smartphone era, mobile phones were shrinking in size — this was the selling point. Nowadays, we see bigger and bigger designs for enhanced entertainment and productivity. The only antidote — as much as I love my iPhone 7 Plus — is to reduce or altogether remove bezels. The Apple Watch fulfils that need for a smaller, simpler communications device, the way that older feature phones once did.

Regarding exercise, however, I do use it for working out and love being able to track my routes during walks and runs. Tech journalists are right to highlight this feature so frequently. It is also brilliant to have an independent Maps app on the wrist for finding points of interest, with taps on the wrist for turn-by-turn navigation.

Whilst not a compulsory purchase, the Series 3 becomes even more compelling when paired with AirPods. These fantastic wireless earphones gained much praise when they were released last year (although low in supply for some time), and rightly so. Beyond music playback, they are the ultimate companion for phone calls, Siri and other general audio through the Apple Watch. While I enjoy using the watch ‘Dick-Tracy-style’ for calls with the speaker, the AirPods facilitate more private conversations.

IMG_7070
They even added a cute, little keypad!

The addition of a ‘Now Playing’ app, which pops up automatically when playing audio, and can be added to the dock, is also a brilliant addition in watchOS 4. It is much more useful than the previous ‘Glance’ version and is great for quick access to controls when streaming Apple Music directly to the wrist.

On music, you can easily load music from preferred playlists and artists on your Apple Watch for local playback when it’s docked and connected to Wi-Fi, but I have so far loved requesting music through Siri on my AirPods, streaming directly from the Apple Music server without even needing my iPhone.

IMG_7068
Streaming is awesome and the new user interface with scrollable cards is a pleasure to use.

Apple no doubt understands the significance of this pairing, as they do not break out revenue for the Apple Watch and AirPods in their quarterly earnings calls. Instead, they refer to both products under the category of ‘wearables’. This is smart for a number of reasons. Not only does it obscure revenue and important data from competitors, it also bolsters the wearable category, reinforcing the value of interconnected devices that revolve around the iPhone. They are established as items of convenience and feature extension in separate, defined category.

Using AirPods with my Series 3 has dramatically enhanced the watch experience, transforming it from a handy, wrist-worn notification machine into an essential communications device. It feels more meaningful than it ever was before.

Now, this brings me to more detail on Siri.

In the face of great competition from Google Assistant, Amazon’s Alexa and Microsoft’s Cortona, Siri has faced increased scrutiny and criticism. Amazon’s Alexa, in the United States particularly, has gained a great response for its predictable and reliable voice commands for variety of functions. My experience with Siri on the watch, contrary to others’ opinions, has been nothing short of stellar. I find her to be reliable and accurate most of the time and a great enhancement to my occasionally phone-free life.

With and without AirPods, I use Siri on the Apple Watch to dictate and send messages, make phone calls, ask for the weather, ask for information (historical, fact-based, etc.) and perhaps my favourite use case: requesting music in the car. I do not have Bluetooth in my car, so I plug my iPhone into USB with a Lightning cable. While driving, I can safely say ‘Hey, Siri’ without looking at my Apple Watch’s display, and ask for any music stored either locally on my present iPhone or directly from Apple Music. The vast majority of the time, Siri understands me over highway road noise and plays the correct tracks. The only real misunderstandings come from more awkward, non-English artist names or track titles, or if I request a song an alternative or obscure version of a song.I do not deny Siri’s imperfection, but I would dispute much of its criticism.

If there’s one thing that has earned the Apple Watch the most criticism, it is perhaps third-party apps. The watch got off to a slow start with apps, as developers did not have access to the full WatchKit with the first generation. Since then, the Apple Watch has gained the ability to run apps by itself, rather than always handing off to an iPhone. This naturally means that developers can make more powerful apps. I could go on and on, but I’d like to share two of the most meaningful apps that I use without my phone on me. These apps are not necessarily my most used apps, but they are great examples of the power that the watch has for search, beyond the predictable functions for communication.

After Credits

Since the watch gained Cinema Mode some time ago (‘Theater Mode’ in the United States), I have though differently about how I use my watch at the movies. I no longer have to choose a different face to remain less distracting in the dark; I can now tap a button in Control Centre and avoid my wrist lighting up and disturbing others.

The free app After Credits enables users to check easily if the movie that they are watching features any additional (surprise) content during or after the credits. Having something like this on the wrist, without having to pull a phone out in the dark or wait through the entire credits, may sound niche, but is something that is of tremendous convenience. I certainly enjoy having such information only a tap away.

IMG_7072
A simple list with a ‘yes’ or a ‘no’.

V for Wikipedia

I love searching for definitions, facts and a range of historical information on sites like Wikipedia. If I am passing a monument, I like to know why it’s there. If I spot an interesting building and want to know when it was constructed, I want to be able to find that easily. If I want to search for the meaning of a word, the iPhone enables me to do that.

Most would assume that the Apple Watch would not be able to fulfil such functions quickly, easily or with adequate detail. The app V for Wikipedia makes all of this possible. On the iPhone, it is a beautifully designed Wikipedia client, transforming the site into a kind of luxurious, digital book. You can search not only for articles in different languages, but also quickly jump through chapter sections, view images in full screen and even see articles about things, places, events or people that are relevant to your location.

The Apple Watch gains a focused, stripped-down version of this app, allowing you to search for articles by voice, scribble or location. I have used the app frequently as a source of information. It is quite satisfying to search all of Wikipedia on your wrist, and you can bet that I have used it to verify facts while in conversation with others. Generally, I am met with expressions of bewilderment at how I answered any given question without a smartphone. Not every developer has mastered user interface design for the watch, but V for Wiki is an example of watchOS app design done well. Across Apple Watch and iPhone, I would rank it as one of my absolute favourite apps.

IMG_7167
Search easily.
IMG_7169
Scroll to read. Simple!

Beyond these app examples, I do wish for certain improvements. My greatest wish for the Apple Watch, particularly now with cellular models, is a dedicated Apple Podcasts app. Downloading and/or syncing to the watch from an iPhone, as was definitely the case with the Music app, may also be too cumbersome an experience with something like podcasts. At least with today’s watchOS 4, if it were even possible only to stream the latest episode of any given podcast subscription, then I would be a happy chappy. Simply give me a list of my subscriptions, show me the latest episodes, and let me tap ‘play’. Podcaster Marco Arment, creator of popular podcast app Overcast, has gone into great detail on the limitations of audio synchronisation (particularly podcasts) on the watch on show Accidental Tech Podcast. There is still plenty of potential here.

Based on the Series 3’s noticeably faster hardware, it would be fantastic if many developers were to make their apps run more independently. For example, Day One (a digital journal) and Spendee (expenditure- and income-tracking) are two apps that I use frequently on the iPhone. Whilst present on the Apple Watch, they are still dependent on a connection to the phone. I am unsure of the exact technical limitations that may restrict this for developers, but perhaps some way of holding added data in the background would be appropriate, which could then sync to the watch when the connection is reestablished.

Needless to say, the biggest disadvantage of carrying only a watch is the inability to take photos. Mobile photography is now such a big part of our daily lives, and I thought that this would really bother me when being out with family and friends. Interestingly, it hasn’t all that much. It has occurred to me that I already have so many photos, and that not having a camera with me 100 per cent of the time actually allows me to be in the moment, rather than obsessively capturing it all the time. With current battery limitations in a device so small (impressive though the new battery is, lasting for two days if necessary), it would be interesting to see if Apple were to include cameras in future models. No doubt there is a greater case for a FaceTime camera rather than an iSight one, as video-calling on a watch makes more sense that capturing stills with a tiny lens. It is difficult to beat physics in this case as lenses need to be a certain thickness. Samsung’s efforts at adding cameras to their earlier Gear watches were blurred disasters, so I’m not gunning for it.

I’ve worn watches since I was a young child; the act of turning my wrist to check the time is etched into my brain. The Apple Watch obviously fulfils the role of a timepiece, but more than this, it has become a stellar device that has changed the way that I think about interacting with the digital world.

Back when I was studying, I was introduced to the somewhat pompous concept of ‘co-presence’. Quite simply, it refers to the idea of being present in two worlds simultaneously: the physical and the digital. You can be using your phone to check the status of any given social network, for example, while sitting and interacting with friends. The issue, as I see it, is that to many people fail to be really pay attention to the physical world while using their devices. The Apple Watch, I believe, enables such ‘co-presence’. A simple haptic tap, without sound, keeps me plugged in, but not locked into the digital world. Devices should augment and support experiences in the real world, rather than consume them.

All in all, I continue to be impressed by the Apple Watch. With major improvements to hardware, software and now cellular networking, it helps me to focus on the things that are actually important. I cannot wait to see where Apple will take this product category.