45. A Ticking Clock

To celebrate the first anniversary of my Lounge Ruminator podcast, I give a quick update on what I’ve learnt so far, the friends that I’ve made and how I’ve realised that you don’t have to be perfect all the time.

Notes

44. Sydney 2000 Olympic Nostalgia with Special Guest Natasha Kandilas Feld

To celebrate the 20th anniversary of the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games, Natasha and I reflect on the opening ceremony and how the event was hyped during our respective childhoods.

Thank you for your patience with some echo in this episode, due to a fun technical issue. Enjoy it!

Notes

43. Trio and Tenet

In this quick update, I discuss my shared launch of a new podcast, called Hemispheric Views (with friends and fellow microbloggers Andrew and Jason) and reflect on a recent trip to the cinema with Natasha to see Christopher Nolan’s Tenet.

Notes

42. Early Adoption with Special Guest Craig Nealon

I’m joined by Craig Nealon to discuss what sparked his long-term interest in technology, the products and apps that have inspired his creative work over the years and the art of predicting whether devices will succeed or flop.

Notes

40. Simplicity with Special Guest Miraz Jordan

This week, fellow Microblogger Miraz Jordan joins me to discuss the value of simplicity in our lives, whether in using plain language, finding ways to be kinder to the planet or even just being willing to leave a rubbish TV show halfway through a season.

Find Miraz Online

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39. International Mac Nerds with Special Guests Andrew Canion and Jason Burk

For this episode, I’m joined by friends (and fellow Micro.blog users) Andrew Canion and Jason Burk. We speak about our shared love of digital technology, the pros and cons of product and network lock-in, the trials and tribulations of email and differences in coffee culture.

Find Andrew and Jason Online

Notes

38. Typos and Consoles

I ruminate on the perceived authority of print and consider how we define the word ‘computer’ in 2020.

Notes

37. New Ways

Often we just do the same old thing—going around in circles. When we do find a new way, we don’t always stop to appreciate how it has affected us. In this episode, I discuss some of my own new ways: mind mapping; using a horribly designed (but useful) app and a different way of using a dining table. Strangely, I also mention a chicken shop.

Notes

Rumination 70: From an [INSERT HERE] Perspective

More and more these days, I hear people using a very specific kind of phrase as they begin to offer their own opinion or take on an issue. If you’re unfamiliar with it, it is what I am now dubbing the ‘perspective-driven dependent clause’. The examples below are just some of the vague, perspective-driven dependent clauses that I have heard uttered by real people online and in person.

From a tech perspective…

From a stakeholder perspective…

From a learning perspective…

From a user-experience perspective…

From a global perspective…

From a timing perspective…

What do these actually mean? Of course, I’ve only included a select few in the list; you could replace any of the modifiers before ‘perspective’ with another word to create your own version.

From a linguistic perspective, it is useless to rail against changes in communication. New expressions, definitions, pronunciations and views on correct usage are natural. We would not have different languages and dialects without such constant iteration, creativity and error.

From a critical perspective, however, it becomes frustrating to hear others’ incessant use of the same kind of dependent clause to open sentences, particularly when what is spoken doesn’t really make any sense. It’s simply a fashionable and somewhat professional-sounding way of speaking, so everyone is mindlessly jumping on board. Take the last example above in italics: ’From a timing perspective…’. Can timing even have a perspective? Is timing a sentient being with eyes or its own mental processes and experiences, from which it can offer its own view at all or perceive three-dimensional space as we do? If it isn’t a sentient being, then what makes the perspective of timing so unique as to call it out?

From a research perspective, let’s look at a few alternatives to this kind of opening dependent clause.

With regard to timing…

On the topic of timing…

Speaking of timing…

Considering the importance of timing…

From a retrospective perspective, do you see how easy it was to find other ways to say it? We have not even explored the possibility of using a synonym for ‘timing’!

From a result-oriented perspective, my recommendation is simple: it is fine to use the word ‘perspective’, of course, but try to use it when referring to someone’s actual view on something; otherwise, mix up your use of language to avoid submitting to groupthink. Here’s an even more extreme idea: drop such an opening altogether! Just say what you have to say.

From a social perspective, you may start to make more sense and stand out with your varied vocabulary.