‘Jery Get Macintosh’

Now, this image speaks to me. It brings back a lot of happy ‘Seinfeld’ viewing memories and Mac associations. 😁

Long before @Seinfeld2000 started posing ‘modarn’ Seinfeld situations and hilariously speculating on Twitter as to whether ‘Jery get iPhone?’ or ‘Jery get iPad?’, Jerry Seinfeld actually went through several Macintosh desktops throughout the duration of the classic series. As a young Seinfeldian and Mac zealot, I took notice of his high-tech desk (for the time) in the background of just about every shot of his New York City apartment.

I stumbled across this great picture mash-up over at pcmag.com, and it shows Jerry’s Macintosh SE (1987) in the early seasons, all the way up to the infamous/rare/early-Jony-Ive-special 20th Anniversary Macintosh (1997) towards the end of the show. He had good taste and this is an early example of Apple’s effective product placement (often unpaid) throughout TV and film history.

If you’ve never watched the show, you should really check it out. It has certainly played a big part in my life, as I watched re-runs very night as a kid and recited quotes endlessly. It even led me to my beautiful partner, Natasha, who also loves the show.

Whilst we may now laugh at the 1990s, a time without iPhones and social media, but instead full of puffier hair and clunky desktops, the comedic situations are still as hilarious and relevant as ever.

Courage

The year 2016 was a very interesting one for Apple, with its fair share of praise and controversy. Mostly, it seems that the company attracted negative attention for issues such as delayed product delivery, a failure to upgrade desktop Macs and the release of the apparently no-longer-pro MacBook Pro. The Mac is probably the biggest sore spot at this point in time.

Whilst I agree that it wasn’t Apple’s best year, I do think that as usual, Apple unjustifiably copped far more of a beating than many of its competitors, even with impressive product innovation and comparatively stellar sales. Consider the amazing design and engineering work involved in the AirPods, Touch Bar and wheelchair-focused fitness functions in watchOS 3, for example. In addition, Apple pushed its services even further, with a revamped Apple Music interface, differential privacy and the biggest release of iOS yet, opening up even more opportunities to developers in the form of iMessage apps.

Perhaps one of the most discussed topics of Apple’s business in 2016 was the decision to remove the headphone jack from the iPhone. Heated discussion developed online following the iPhone keynote, where Senior VP of Worldwide Product Marketing Phil Schiller stated that in making such a decision, Apple had shown ‘courage’. Schiller was mocked immediately for saying this, but I believe this to be the case. Like the removal of floppy disk and optical drives, Apple made a decision to drive a more wireless future.

In the Tim Cook era at Apple, I believe we now also see a reversal of the once-famous Jobsian ‘reality distortion field’. Whilst Jobs once apparently distorted reality around product launches, tech journalists now distort reality, praising companies such as Google and Microsoft for announcing products that either never get released, or that sell only a fraction of what Apple achieves. Remember when Microsoft’s bot turned into a Nazi online? Yep, people forgot about that. Remember when Google copied the external design of the iPhone 6 with its Pixel, leaving behind the not-so-successful Nexus line? Yep, people didn’t really care about that either.

The topic of courage and Apple’s different way of doing things was brought to my mind again after finding an excerpt from one of Jobs’s appearances at the D Conference, from back in 2010. In this excerpt, from the 2 min 15 sec mark, Jobs elaborates on what Apple believes it takes to make a successful, effective product. It involves making compromises and saying “No” to things that may seem crazy to exclude. Check it out below.

Apple has always made controversial decisions, and even the most devoted loyalists seem to forget this. Is the Mac being forgotten? No, of course not. The focus is instead on iOS, where the most consumer appeal and sales are happening. Entirely new input technologies like the Touch Bar do not occur in product categories that are being phased out. Likewise, whilst Apple is apparently exiting the display and router (AirPort) business, this is most likely another example of sharpening the company’s product focus. Remember when Apple used to make digital cameras, printers and even a gaming console? All of those products were given the chop, and when Jobs returned in 1997, he reduced the entire company’s product line to the famous consumer-pro matrix. In recent years, Apple has proudly stated that it is the company whose products all fit onto a single table.

What Jobs said in the video above remains true today. Indeed, the company can always listen to its customers more, and it should not ignore the interests of the pros and loyalists who kept it going in its darkest times. I do think, however, that more exciting things are still on the horizon. Apple continues to show courage in its design decisions, and is never afraid to do what may be unpopular for success in the long run.

Review: Designed by Apple in California

Well, this was unexpected…


A short time ago, Apple released a new product; no, it isn’t a computer, in fact, it isn’t electronic at all. It’s a book, and a beautiful book at that. Titled Designed by Apple in California, the book chronicles the last 20 years of Apple product design, with a suave introduction by none other than Chief Design Officer Jony Ive. The photos were taken by Andrew Zuckerman.


Upon hearing of the book, I knew that I had to have it. I already possess Iconic: A Photographic Tribute to Apple Innovation, by Jonathan Zufi, and that does a fantastic job of tracing Apple’s entire product history. A book by Apple, however, is unique and intriguing. It is both a product in its own right and an ingenious marketing tool.

Apple’s own effort, eight years in the making, is somewhat different from Iconic in the sense that it only focuses on the last 20 years. Apple doesn’t often look back, as many analysts have noted. In this case, however, it has looked back to the point of Apple’s metaphorical ‘rebirth’, with the return of co-founder Steve Jobs. The book is even dedicated to him.

Before even opening the packaging, it’s a product to behold. The outer packaging is in fact a part of the overall book product, acting as a protective cover and with an elegant Apple product decoration on the inside.

Apple’s signature pull-tab on the box, which tears cleanly down the middle of the packaging
Packaging that functions as part of the product
An elegant, ‘whole-book dust jacket’, so to speak…

The design of this book is very impressive, as it uses ‘specially milled German paper with gilded matte silver edges’. These page edges beautifully mimic the aluminium sheen of Macs’ unibody enclosures.

Even the ink on the inside has been considered, as certain product images act differently under direct light. Take, for example, the first product that is featured: the iMac from 1998. The computer’s translucent plastic body remains matte on the page, whilst holes in the body and chrome finishes reflect light as the page is turned. This is an outstanding effect, and one can’t help but think of the more skeuomorphic design that was used in earlier versions of OS X and iOS. These printed images behave like the real-world products that they represent, just as digital buttons, icons and finishes once represented the real. This style was eventually replaced with the more minimalistic, flat design that we know today, but it makes complete sense now in a book that attempts to showcase design, without the actual products in front of the reader.

The photo doesn’t do it justice, but notice the shininess of the blue in contrast to the matte white.

If you’re curious to have a closer look at this hardcover book, you’ll have to visit one of only a selection of Apple stores. I visited the Sydney store on George Street, where both the large and small versions were displayed on custom book stands close the Apple Watch tables.

The small version, which I purchased, cost AU$289. Whilst quite expensive, the price is ultimately reflected in the quality of the product. Check out the book online here.

Some analysts and fans are concerned about the amount of retrospection that Apple has been doing of late (e.g. the recent MacBook Pro reveal video). I’m not concerned, in fact, I’m excited. Apple’s strength has always been in communicating its brand and product stories, and this is another way of doing precisely that. The company is recalling its past and understanding where its successes (and failures) lie.

Looking back at this company’s past makes me even more excited about its future.

The iPod lives on…

For years now, iPod sales have been declining. The reasons are obvious: cannibalisation by the iPhone; and the rise of music streaming over the purchase/download model. While we see fewer and fewer iPods these days, they do appear regularly in a number of different contexts. The first examples that come to mind are those who use iPods with older docking stations with 30-pin connectors, and people who enjoy exercising with iPod nanos and shuffles.

Perhaps the most intriguing situation is one that I have seen numerous times on public transport: people using iPod Classics and nanos for music consumption, all the while using their Android phones for apps and other general tasks. I consider this to be a sign of Apple’s influence in the broader music industry. Even with the plethora of music consumption choices on Google’s Play Store, be it Spotify, Pandora, Guvera or some other service, there is a significant number of people who stick to the tried-and-true model of downloading songs from iTunes and syncing with an iPod.

We can speculate about the reasons for this. Perhaps it’s just easier for these users to stick with what works. Maybe they like to keep their old iPods (or even buy new ones) for exercise. They may even prefer to have an alternative music source in case their smartphone battery dies.

I think there’s a deeper meaning.

I believe that this (specific) continued use of iPods is an indication of Apple’s brand power, as well as the significance of music ownership. During the Jobs era, Apple clearly established itself as the home of digital music: a legal, accessible alternative to worrisome services at the time, like Napster. This dominance has since been challenged, particularly by Spotify, however Apple is quickly growing its newest service, Apple Music, with millions of paid subscribers. For these persistent iPod users, Apple continues to be the best place to find music. iTunes remains to be a service that they can trust, no matter how bloated it might have become. Considering that some (not all) Android users dislike iPhones, it’s fascinating to see how a subset of users cling to these Apple devices even when their smartphones can do so much more, all in the one package.

On the topic of music purchasing versus streaming, there is something to be said about owning your music. While I love using Apple Music now, prior to its introduction I was vehemently against streaming. The idea of paying a subscription fee rather than maintaining purchasing habit seemed ridiculous to me. I’ve converted now (and I’m happy that I did), as access to such a broad library of 30 million songs, along with curated radio stations and playlists, is just too appealing. I can understand, however, why others may not be so willing. Owning stuff feels more familiar and secure.

I have always been and will continue to be a fan of the iPod. After the iMac, which reinvigorated a dying company in 1998, the iPod was the beginning of Apple’s truly magnificent success in the early 2000s, leading up to today with the iPhone, iPad and Apple Watch. No one else had ever achieved the level of integration in consumer electronics and services that Apple did at the time, and that’s still the case. Alphabet (Google), Microsoft, Amazon and Facebook all offer comprehensive services and ecosystems, but no one offers the whole widget like Apple does.

The iPod’s influence was so huge that it is still felt today, and it seems that even some devoted Android smartphone users haven’t forgotten this.

Ahh clickbait… (sigh)

Time and time again, I’m disappointed by the state of tech journalism online. Not a day goes by when someone feels the need to write a false or sensational article about a technological consumer product. All tech companies, big and small, are targets for such articles; Google, Facebook, Microsoft and Amazon all cop a huge amount of criticism. Apple, though, seems to have a special place reserved as the target for baseless, ‘journalistic’ drivel.

Take, for example, the recent article Apple Watch will ruin your life and I’m ashamed to have one on my wrist… shared by Independent from The Washington Post, the writer attempts to convince his readers that the Apple Watch is a complete waste of money.

I understand that wearables aren’t for everyone, and even within this category of products, people have their perfectly justified preferences for Apple, Google Android, Pebble, Fitbit and others. Even as an Apple fan, I’m not so blindly entranced by the brand that I can’t see the advantages of other products and the shortcomings of Apple’s own.

Unfortunately, this piece is purely one of sensational opinion, designed to attack Apple, seemingly only because of some kind of tall poppy syndrome (I assume). The writer criticises the ‘slowness’ of Apple Watch, without so much of a reference to the fact that it is a first-generation product, or the fact that Apple has worked to achieve 7x faster app launch with the upcoming watchOS 3. Much of the ‘slowness’ up until now has been present mostly in third-party apps, and has been a result of Apple’s conservative use of memory in order to maximise battery life. It turns out that they over-shot and have plenty of memory to spare.

There’s also a lazy claim that Apple has “failed to capture the attention of the wider public”. This is baseless, because Apple hasn’t even released any official sales data to which the writer could refer. Furthermore, numerous analysts and statistical organisations have cited a huge jump in global smartwatch sales, spurred on by Apple Watch. Before Apple Watch, the wearable category was without a story or design standard. As some form of evidence, according to Strategy Analytics, smartwatch sales sky-rocketed 316 per cent between Q4 of 2014 and Q4 of 2015. Juniper also stated that Apple Watch accounted for over 50 per cent of smartwatch sales in all of 2015. Take this data as you will, but it’s certainly more evidence than what the clickbait article offers.

Disappointingly, the writer also inserts (without much of a subtle link or segue), a video with the caption: ‘Can Samsung beat the Apple Watch?’. What does this have to do with the quality of the watch? This article isn’t so much a fair critique of the product and where it can go in the future. It’s pure clickbait that attempts to perpetuate a meaningless dichotomy of Apple and Samsung in the tech space. Samsung is not Apple’s only competitor, and there are many companies doing interesting things out there than just these two companies.

I respect the opinion of this writer. If he doesn’t enjoy his Apple Watch, that’s totally fine. I just wish that tech journalists would lift their game in reporting on the strengths and weaknesses of products, regardless of who designs them, so that consumers can make informed decisions that will benefit their digital lives.

App Review: Hyper by Antihero, Inc.

I’ve downloaded many, many apps since my first iPhone in 2008. At my most extreme, I had 245 apps installed and neatly organised in folders, fully alphabetised and categorised. In more recent times, I decided that things had become ridiculous; I had to let go of some apps to restore some sanity to my home screen. Nowadays, I have only around 75 apps on my iPhone, and I’m much more critical of every free and priced app download. For an app to make its way onto my home screen, it had better be good.

Well, an app came along that is most definitely worth it.

Hyper by Antihero, Inc. is a fantastic, new app, which I can only describe as the perfect synthesis of on-demand web video and curated, almost broadcast-style content. Every day, the app team trawls the Web, searching for what it believes are the ten best videos of the day. Once selected, they land on Hyper’s menu, each with a beautiful, bold title, the duration and easy sharing options linked to the share-sheets available in iOS.

The app made its first appearance on the new Apple TV, with an easy-to-use, swipeable interface that is optimised for the new Siri Remote.

Hyper icon on Apple TV Home screen

The iPad version followed soon afterwards, with the iPhone left until last. This is rather interesting, as the iPhone is often first on developers’ minds for apps, whether they are games, utilities or steaming libraries. The iPhone is where the cash is. In this case, it’s obvious that the team had nailed the interface for TV first, and decided to take the time to translate the experience in a considerate way for smaller displays.

Hyper running on Apple TV

Not only do they curate content for each day, they also group the best of the week into an easy weekend recap, so that you can catch up on what you might have missed.

Hyper on iPhone

It’s the synthesis, however, that makes this app so much fun to use. You choose the content that you want to watch (curated according to your interests upon first use), without having to search for it yourself. Yes, it’s a first-world problem, but who has the time to subscribe to 500 YouTube channels and check push notifications all day?

While I often start each morning scrolling through the feed in my Apple News app, I end each day with a visit to Hyper. Furthermore, if you’re the type to watch videos on your commute each morning, the videos actually download automatically over Wi-Fi early in the day, so you can watch it on-the-go without worrying about nasty data charges.

Sharing, info and saving options on the playback/pause screen

I could go on about this app all day; I’ve learnt and laughed a lot using it. There have been awesome videos from social organisations, YouTubers and various other documentary, sport  and comedy sites. The folk at Hyper have great taste.

Do yourself a favour and try the app. It’s well worth your time, and if anything, will bring a bit of focus to your digital life.

Star rating

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

Apple Pay in Oz

Apple Pay on iPhone

Finally, Apple Pay is in Australia. FINALLY. Since first purchasing the iPhone 6 and Apple Watch, I had been itching to use it, but alas, no banks or credit unions in Australia would collaborate with Apple for some time.

Upon hearing of its exclusive availability through ANZ (other than with American Express, which technically had it first), I rushed immediately into ANZ in Martin Place to create an account. “Wow”, you may be thinking, “Why on Earth is it such a big deal? You must be some sort of ridiculous fanboy”. Well, yes, I am quite the Apple fanboy, but it’s not simply about having the latest Apple service or iThingy. I’m not the only one who has switched banks either; plenty of others have and now the other big banks are reconsidering their relationships with Apple. Everyone wants more customers.

Whilst mobile payment solutions using “near field communication” (NFC chip) technology have existed for some time, particularly in the Android world, Apple Pay delivers some serious benefits and the sort of refinement that comes only from deep consideration and observing the market first. Apple is often accused of never ‘inventing’ anything (which is false, but whatever), but instead it often sits back, observes the market, then swoops in with a more elegant solution that smooths the rough edges of earlier digital technology. Apple Pay is another great example of this, as it goes further in convenience, security and overall customer experience.

Apple Pay, first of all, can be added to the Wallet app on iPhones and Apple Watches. Particularly in the case of the watch, it is super-convenient to simply wave your wrist over a payment terminal after double-tapping the side button. A reassuring tap on the wrist (and beep if not set to silent) lets you know that your payment has been successful. Let me tell you, this morning I encountered quite a shocked staff member at Thrive in Australia Square as I purchased a smoothie. His jaw dropped as the payment was approved from my wrist. Naturally, I had to explain the magic.

Apple Pay on Apple Watch

The next great part of the Apple Pay story is security when paying for goods in a bricks-and-mortar shop. Whereas signatures, pins, magnetic strips and card chips all have their security flaws and are susceptible to scanners, Apple Pay deals with these issues in two key ways. First, when you add your card, your numbers are not sent to the cloud, instead stored in what’s called a “secure element” on the phone’s processor. If your phone is stolen or goes missing, there’s no need to replace the original card provided by your financial institution, as no private details are displayed on-screen or associated with your online accounts (e.g. iCloud). Second, when you purchase goods using Apple Pay, no card numbers are sent to the merchant. Instead, a process called “tokenisation” sends a randomly generated number, which is recognised and approved at the other end.

Last but certainly not least, Apple Pay can be used online (web and mobile apps). When you go to purchase an item online, Apple Pay springs to life, requesting your fingerprint through the iPhone’s Touch ID system, which is built into the Home button. Some of the popular apps that already support Apple Pay online, for example, include of course the Apple online store, Airbnb, Houzz, Groupon and Fancy. The number of supported apps and services will only grow.

I, for one, have been very impressed with Apple’s execution of Apple Pay. It’s quick, easy and leaves a lot of retail staff gobsmacked, and it’s fun to watch people fumble change after you’re already walking away with your smoothie. In Australia, as opposed to in the U.S., we’re also very fortunate to have had such a widespread adoption of tap-payment terminals. It’s now accepted here, and the big banks’ combined effort and investment in rolling out this technology ultimately explains why they were so unwilling to negotiate with Apple — they have to pay Apple a small fee to facilitate the service, which luckily does not carry over to the customer. The one concerning fact, I find, is that so many people are unfamiliar with Apple Pay and similar tap payment solutions. Quite simply, Apple could still do a lot more to educate people about the benefits of this great service and how readily available it is for use. It’s convenient and it’s secure, which is great for everyone.

I can’t wait to see what’s in store for Apple Pay. With talk about using credit and debit cards on public transport readers, it would be exceptionally cool to simply wave your wrist as you walk onto a bus or through railway turnstiles.

It can only get better from here. If you’re with ANZ and you’re not using Apple Pay with your iPhone or Apple Watch, I ask you, “Why?!”.

Image credit: Apple Australia (2016)